Beauty is in the eye of the Creator

positive mind positive thought positive thinking positive atittude positive perspective positive outlook positive ideas positive principles positive belief optimistic optimism

We may call them grasses but we can’t deny that God made them and He made them beautiful.

Visiting the mountains of Don Salvador Benedicto  will get you to thinking that there must really be a God up there Who made it all. Just by merely looking as far as your eyes could see overwhelms your heart at the greatness and beauty displayed before you. Not a word could express of how much you wanted to feel or taste or hold the magnificent creation of God. But that’s not all there is.

O grasses! They are so little and are often unnoticed. But they too are masterpiece of God. They too affirms the goodness of God since the day God created them and saw them beautiful. Grasses are like the unwanted events of life. We don’t desire them or cherish them. But those unwanted events are part of life given by God. We may not want them but God gave them for us to appreciate. Look intently to it and you will  see beauty the way God sees it.

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About Marmar Dagu-ob

Will graduate life with honor and no regret.

Posted on June 18, 2013, in On Nature. Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Beautiful post. All the glory to God. I like your thoughts on the truth of the grasses. Thank you for following poetrycottage.

    • You’re welcome and thank you!

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Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, Revelation, List of biblical names From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Hitchcock analysis of Holy Bible 1871 Smith’s Bible Dictionary 1863 Easton’s Bible Dictionary 1894 Nave’s Topical Bible 1905 This page introduces a list of about 2,600 proper names with their meanings from the Bible, mainly compiled from the 19th century public domain resources of Hitchcock’s Bible Names Dictionary as part of Hitchcock’s New and Complete Analysis of the Holy Bible written by Roswell Dwight Hitchcock[1][2] and Dictionary of the Bible by William R. Smith.[3] Most of the male and female names and their definitions can also be found in Herbert Lockyer’s reference books All the Men of the Bible[4] and All the Women of the Bible.[5] Most of the divine names and their definitions can also be found in Lockyer’s All the Divine Names and Titles in the Bible.[6] Many of the biblical names can also be found in Baker’s Evangelical Dictionary, Easton’s Bible Dictionary, Nave’s Topical Bible and Torrey’s New Topical Textbook.[7] Others can be found in the Catholic Encyclopedia and the new Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge (Dictionary edition).[8] The biblical names pertaining just to the Old Testament can all be found in Joan Comay’s reference book titled Who’s Who in the Old Testament.[9] Other Biblical name definitions of places, cities, countries, angels, gods, mountains and Hebrew names can be found in Nancy M. Tischler’s encyclopedia All Things in the Bible: an Encyclopedia of the Biblical World.[10] Contents [hide] 1 Significance of names 2 List of biblical names 3 See also 4 References 5 Footnotes 6 Further reading 7 Related sayings Significance of names[edit] Many names describe nations, people, and ancient history. Some describe expressions of hopes, revelations of divine purposes, and prophecies of the future. Some are part of genealogical histories, as it was common in Jewish customs to keep a family history. Sometimes names indicated certain circumstances with their birth or family line. Characteristics and traits of people were an important aspect of names in ancient Israel. For example the name Nabal means “senseless and fool”, and Abigail indicated that this is what her husband amounted to (1 Sam 25:25). Sometimes names pointed to occupations, sometimes to a symbolic or a prophetic feature. Sometimes place names have become personal names (e.g. the name Eden, from the Garden of Eden). Sometimes names were given to show family relationships (e.g. uncle, father). Names sometimes had a special meaning (e.g. praise, additional, rebellion, bitterness). Sometimes names were of a type of plant or had charactistics of natural phenomenon (i.e. thunder, lightning, rain). Sometimes names were related to animals or their characteristics.[11] Before the Protestant Reformation the most common names were Adam, Benjamin, Elias, Daniel, David, Joseph, Samson, and Solomon. After the Reformation names like Aaron, Elijah, Joshua, Moses, and Nathaniel were added to mainstream popularity. Saint names associated with the Roman Catholic Church were used less after the Reformation. Maher-shalal-hash-baz is the longest name in the Bible, and was much used as a given name. Mary and John are the most used of the Christian names.[12] List of biblical names[edit] Note that “names” refers to any noun, which may be: people, places, cities, countries, angels, gods, mountains, etc. Meanings of the names are not always definite or clear, but a possible meaning has been provided in every case. Most of the meanings come from Hebrew, while the others come from Greek, Aramaic, or Latin. A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – L – M – N – O – P – Q – R – S – T – U – V – Y – Z List of biblical names starting with A List of biblical names starting with B List of biblical names starting with C List of biblical names starting with D List of biblical names starting with E List of biblical names starting with F List of biblical names starting with G List of biblical names starting with H List of biblical names starting with I List of biblical names starting with J List of biblical names starting with K List of biblical names starting with L List of biblical names starting with M List of biblical names starting with N List of biblical names starting with O List of biblical names starting with P List of biblical names starting with Q List of biblical names starting with R List of biblical names starting with S List of biblical names starting with T List of biblical names starting with U List of biblical names starting with V List of biblical names starting with Y List of biblical names starting with Z See also[edit] Genealogy of the Bible List of major biblical figures List of minor biblical figures List of names for the biblical nameless Modern name for Biblical place names References[edit] Comay, Joan, Who’s Who in the Old Testament, Oxford University Press, 1971, ISBN 0-19-521029-8 Lockyer, Herbert, All the men of the Bible, Zondervan Publishing House (Grand Rapids, Michigan), 1958 Lockyer, Herbert, All the women of the Bible, Zondervan Publishing 1988, ISBN 0-310-28151-2 Lockyer, Herbert, All the Divine Names and Titles in the Bible, Zondervan Publishing 1988, ISBN 0-310-28041-9 Tischler, Nancy M., All things in the Bible: an encyclopedia of the biblical world , Greenwood Publishing, Westport, Conn. : 2006 ISBN 0-313-33082-4 Footnotes[edit] Jump up ^ Roswell Dwight Hitchcock, Washburn Professor of Church History in Union Theological Seminary. Bible Names Dictionary, 1869, New York City Jump up ^ Hitchcock’s Bible Names Dictionary at Christian Classics Ethereal Library of Calvin College for additional references and sources Jump up ^ William R. Smith, Dictionary of the Bible Jump up ^ Herbert Lockyer, All the Men of the Bible, pp. 19–369 Jump up ^ Lockyer, All the Women of the Bible, ISBN 0-310-28151-2, pp. 11–320 Jump up ^ Lockyer, All the Divine Names and Titles in the Bible, ISBN 0-310-28041-9, pp. 16–368 Jump up ^ Bible Study Tools Jump up ^ Bible Study Tools library Jump up ^ Joan Comay, Who’s Who in the Old Testament, ISBN 978-0-415-26031-2. pp. 1-398 Jump up ^ Nancy M. Tischler, All Things in the Bible: an Encyclopedia of the Biblical World. ISBN 978-0-313-33082-7. 808 pp. Jump up ^ Lockyer, pp. 11-14 Jump up ^ Lockyer, p. 14 Further reading[edit] Bible Study Tools Nave’s Topical Bible Smith’s Bible Dictionary Easton’s Bible Dictionary Catholic Encyclopedia 1917 Torrey’s New Topical Textbook Baker’s Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge (Dictionary edition), List of major biblical figures From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Bible is a canonical collection of texts considered sacred in Judaism or Christianity. Different religious groups include different books within their canons, in different orders, and sometimes divide or combine books, or incorporate additional material into canonical books. Christian Bibles range from the sixty-six books of the Protestant canon to the eighty-one books of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church canon. Contents [hide] 1 Hebrew Bible 1.1 Prophets 1.2 Kings 1.3 Priests 1.4 Tribes of Israel 2 New Testament 2.1 Jesus and his relatives 2.2 Christian Apostles of Jesus 2.3 Priests 2.4 Prophets 2.5 Other believers 2.6 Secular rulers 3 See also 4 References Hebrew Bible[edit] [hide] v t e Adam to David according to the Hebrew Bible Creation to Flood Adam Seth Enos Kenan Mahalalel Jared Enoch Methuselah Lamech Noah Shem Cain line Adam Cain Enoch Irad Mehujael Methusael Lamech Tubal-cain Patriarchs after Flood Arpachshad Shelah Eber Peleg Reu Serug Nahor Terah Abraham Isaac Jacob Nationhood to Kingship Judah Perez Hezron Ram Amminadab Nahshon Salmon Boaz Obed Jesse David Prophets[edit] [hide] v t e Prophets in the Hebrew Bible Pre-Patriarchs (Bible) Abel Kenan Enoch Noah (rl) Patriarchs and Matriarchs Abraham Isaac Jacob Joseph Sarah Rebecca Rachel Leah Israelite prophets in the Torah Moses (rl) Aaron Miriam Eldad & Medad Phinehas Prophets mentioned in the Former Prophets Joshua Deborah Gideon Eli Elkanah Hannah Abigail Samuel Gad Nathan David Solomon Jeduthun Ahijah Elijah Elisha Shemaiah Iddo Hanani Jehu Micaiah Jahaziel Eliezer Zechariah ben Jehoiada Huldah Major Prophets Isaiah (rl) Jeremiah Ezekiel Daniel (rl) Minor Prophets Hosea Joel Amos Obadiah Jonah (rl) Micah Nahum Habakkuk Zephaniah Haggai Zechariah Malachi Noahide prophets Beor Balaam Job (rl) Other prophets Amoz Beeri Baruch Agur Uriah Buzi Mordecai Esther (rl) Oded Azariah Italics denote that the status as a prophet is not universally accepted. rl are articles dealing with the prophet within Rabbinic Literature. Kings[edit] [hide] v t e Rulers of Ancient Israel Pre-dynastic Abimelech United Monarchy Saul Ish-boseth David Solomon Israel (Northern Kingdom) Jeroboam I Nadab Baasha Elah Zimri Tibni Omri Ahab Ahaziah Jehoram Jehu Jehoahaz Jehoash Jeroboam II Zechariah Shallum Menahem Pekahiah Pekah Hoshea Judah (Southern Kingdom) Rehoboam Abijam Asa Jehoshaphat Jehoram Ahaziah Athaliah Jehoash Amaziah Uzziah Jotham Ahaz Hezekiah Manasseh Amon Josiah Jehoahaz Jehoiakim Jeconiah Zedekiah Hasmonean dynasty Simon Maccabaeus John Hyrcanus Aristobulus I Alexander Jannaeus Salome Alexandra Hyrcanus II Aristobulus II Antigonus II Mattathias Herodian dynasty Herod the Great Archelaus Antipas Philip the Tetrarch Salome I Agrippa Agrippa II Post-Second Temple era Simon bar Kokhba Italics indicate a disputed reign or non-royal title Priests[edit] Aaron Elazar Eli Phinehas Tribes of Israel[edit] According to the Book of Genesis, the Israelites were descendants of the sons of Jacob, who was renamed Israel after wrestling with an angel. His twelve male children become the ancestors of the Twelve Tribes of Israel. Asher Benjamin Dan Gad Issachar Joseph, which was split into two tribes descended from his sons: Tribe of Ephraim Tribe of Menasheh Judah Levi Naphtali Reuben Simeon Zebulun New Testament[edit] Jesus and his relatives[edit] Jesus Mary, mother of Jesus Joseph Brothers of Jesus James the Just Christian Apostles of Jesus[edit] The Twelve:[1] Peter (Simon Kefa) Andrew (Simon’s brother) James son of Zebedee John son of Zebedee (aka John the Evangelist) Philip Bartholomew Thomas also known as “Doubting Thomas” Matthew James son of Alphaeus Judas son of James (aka Thaddeus or Judas Lebbaeus) Simon the Canaanite Judas Iscariot (the traitor) Others: Paul[2] Titus Matthias[3] Mary Magdalene Priests[edit] Caiaphas, high priest Annas, first high priest of Roman Judea Zechariah, father of John the Baptist Prophets[edit] Agabus Anna (Bible) Simeon (Gospel of Luke) John the Baptist Other believers[edit] Apollos Aquila Barnabas Dionysius the Areopagite Epaphras, fellow prisoner of Paul (Philemon 1:23), fellow worker (Colossians 4:12-13) Joseph of Arimathea Lazarus Luke Mark Martha Mary Magdalene Mary, sister of Martha Nicodemus Onesimus Philemon Priscilla Silas Sopater Stephen, first martyr Timothy Secular rulers[edit] See also: Herod Herod the Great Herod Antipas, called “Herod the Tetrarch” or “Herod” in the Gospels and in Acts 4:27 Pontius Pilate Agrippa I, called “King Herod” or “Herod” in Acts 12 Felix governor of Judea who was present at the trial of Paul, and his wife Drusilla in Acts 24:24 [show] v t e New Testament people See also[edit] Portal icon Christianity portal Portal icon Judaism portal Portal icon Bible portal Bible List of biblical names – long alphabetical list of names with their meanings List of Jewish Biblical figures List of minor Biblical figures – long list of minor figures with brief explanations & Bible references List of burial places of biblical figures, List of Christian preachers From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Charles Spurgeon, the “Prince of Preachers”, in action, by Ape. The following is a list of Christian clergy who are notable for their preaching in various settings. Contents [hide] 1 Inter-Denominational 2 Catholic 3 Lutheran 4 Reformed 5 ONE GOD Believer Christian Churches 6 Presbyterian 7 Anglican/Episcopalian 8 Puritan/Congregationalist/Nonconformist 9 Baptist 10 Methodist 11 Church of Christ 12 Members Church of God International 13 Charismatic 14 Pentecostal 15 Seventh-day Adventist 16 Four Square Gospel 17 Other Protestant 18 Preachers noted for secular achievements 19 Fictional preachers 19.1 Literature 19.2 Film 20 See also 21 References Inter-Denominational[edit] Joseph Wayne Parker (born 1988) early on served as layman in Anglican Diocese of San Joaquin, served as an Associate Pastor at a Charismatic Church in Bakersfield, Currently assist in Baptist church transitional leadership ministry. Catholic[edit] Portrait of Hortensio Félix Paravicino painted by El Greco circa 1609. Bishop Sheen Ignatius of Antioch (35–107) (also Eastern Orthodox Church) Polycarp (69–155) (also the Eastern Orthodox Church) John Chrysostom (347–407) (also Eastern Orthodox Church) Bernard of Clairvaux (1090–1153) Henry of Lausanne d. 1148, heretical, opposed by Bernard Dominic of Guzmán (1170-1221) (founder of the Order of Preachers) John Bromyard (died c. 1352) Johannes Tauler (1300–1361), German (Dominican) mystic Jan Huss (1369–1415) (condemned and executed as a heretic) Bernardino of Siena (1380–1444), Franciscan Giovanni da Capistrano (1386–1456), Franciscan James of the Marches (1391–1476), Franciscan Girolamo Savonarola (1452–1498), Dominican, also executed as a heretic Petrus Canisius (1521–1597), Jesuit preacher of the Counter-Reformation in the German-speaking lands Hortensio Félix Paravicino, Trinitarian brother, preacher to the court Philip II of Spain, and poet Jacques-Benigne Bossuet (1627–1704), whose sermons are classics of French prose Louis Bourdaloue (1632–1704) Jesuit preacher of the age of Louis XIV Jean Baptiste Massillon (1663–1742), Oratorian John Henry Newman (1801–1890), converted from Anglicanism Bernard Vaughan SJ (1847–1922) Charles Coughlin (1891–1975) Bishop Fulton Sheen (1895–1975) Pope John Paul II, (1920–2005) Lutheran[edit] Martin Luther Martin Luther, former Augustinian monk (1483–1547) Philipp Melanchthon (1497–1560) Lars Levi Laestadius (1800–1861) C. F. W. Walther (1811–1887) Bernt B. Haugan (born 1862), Lutheran minister, politician, and temperance leader[1] Martin Niemöller (1892–1984) Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906–1945) J. A. O. Preus II (1920–1994), former President of the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod during the Seminex affair Gerald B. Kieschnick (born 1943), former President of the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod Dr Wallace Schulz (born c. 1945), former host of The Lutheran Hour and former second vice President of the LCMS Mark Hanson (born 1946) Ken Klaus, current host of the The Lutheran Hour David Benke (born 1946) Don Wharton (born 1951), Christian musician and Lutheran minister Mark Jeske (born 1952), Pastor of St. Marcus Lutheran Church (Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod) in Milwaukee, WI, and the preacher for Time of Grace[2][3] Dr. Walter A. Maier (1893–1950), host of The Lutheran Hour from 1930–1950 Matthew C. Harrison (born 1962), current President of LCMS John Warwick Montgomery (born 1931), Lutheran apologist Gerhard Forde (September 10, 1927 – August 9, 2005) Rod Rosenbladt (born c. 1942) Reformed[edit] John Calvin Huldrych Zwingli, (1484–1531) John Calvin, (1509–1564) ONE GOD Believer Christian Churches[edit] Bishop Louie R. Santos Jesus Christ “To God Be The Glory International., “Friends Again” TV Program Presbyterian[edit] John Knox, (1513–1572) Peter Marshall, (1903–1949) Ian Paisley (born 1926) Frederick Buechner (born 1926) Timothy J. Keller (born 1950)[4] R.C. Sproul (born 1939) Douglas Wilson (born 1953) Anglican/Episcopalian[edit] Stained glass window featuring Archbishop Cranmer and the Oxford Martyrs John Wesley Nicholas Ridley, (died 1555) one of the Oxford Martyrs Hugh Latimer, (1470–1555) another of the Oxford Martyrs (1470–1555) Thomas Cranmer, (1489–1556), Archbishop of Canterbury and an Oxford Martyr Lancelot Andrewes, (1555–1626) John Donne (1572–1631) also a famous poet John Tillotson, (1630–1694) John Wesley (1703–1791), remained an Anglican priest until death. George Whitefield (1714–1770), remained an Anglican priest until death. Phillips Brooks, (1835–1893) Bishop of Massachusetts N. T. Wright, (born 1948) former Bishop of Durham, Rt Revd Professor, St. Andrews Michael Bruce Curry (born 1953) Bishop of North Carolina Lindsay Urwin (born 1956) former Bishop of Horsham,now Administrator of the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham Edward Thomas Parker (born 1950-Died 2009) Layman in the Anglican Diocese of San Joaquin until death. Puritan/Congregationalist/Nonconformist[edit] Jonathan Edwards Robert Abbot, (c. 1588 – c. 1622) John Davenport, (1597–1670) John Harvard, (1607–1638), benefactor of New College in Massachusetts which later changed its name in his honor Joseph Alleine (c. 1634–1668) Matthew Henry, (1662–1714) Cotton Mather, (1663–1728) Jonathan Edwards (1703–1758) Peter Taylor Forsyth, (1848-1921) G. Campbell Morgan, (1863–1945) Martyn Lloyd-Jones, (1899–1981) Baptist[edit] File:Billy Graham bw photo, AprWilliam Miller (February 15, 1782 – December 20, 1849 il 11, 1966.jpg Billy Graham Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Roger Williams, (1603–1684) John Bunyan, (1628–1688) Benjamin Keach (1640–1704) John Gill (1697–1771) William Miller (1782 – 1849) William Garrett Lewis (c. 1834–1885) C. H. Spurgeon, (1834–1892) Alexander Maclaren (1826–1910) John Alexis Edgren (1839–1908) Oswald Chambers (1874–1917) F.B Meyer (1847–1929) George W. Truett, (1867–1944) J. Frank Norris (1877–1952) Mordecai Ham (1877–1961) Harry Emerson Fosdick (1878–1969) W.A. Criswell (1909–2002) E.V. Hill (1934–2003) Tony Campolo (born 1935) Duke Kimbrough McCall (born 1914) Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929–1968) Moishe Rosen (born 1932) Jerry Falwell (1933–2007) Adrian Rogers (1931-2005) Charles Stanley (born 1932) Mark Driscoll (born 1970) James T. Draper, Jr. (born 1935) John MacArthur (born 1939)[5][6] Jesse Jackson (born 1941) Lewis Brown (born 1941) Neiliezhü Üsou (1941–2009) Stephen F. Olford (1918-2004) John Piper, (1946-)[7] Albert Mohler (born 1959) Mark Dever (born 1960) Corey J. Hodges (born 1971) Douglas W. Phillips (born 1965) Kent Hovind, creationist Johnny Hunt (born 1952) Paul Washer (born 1961) Roger Spadlin (born 1954) co-Senior Pastor of Valley Baptist Church of Bakersfield Methodist[edit] Daniel Rowland (1713–1790) Francis Asbury (1747–1816) Peter Cartwright (1785–1873) William Booth (1829–1912) – founder of the Salvation Army Bob Jones, Sr. (1883–1968) William Edwin Sangster (1900-1960) Carl Stuart Hamblen (1908–1989) William Willimon (born 1946)[4] Church of Christ[edit] Batsell Baxter (1886–1956) Batsell Barrett Baxter (1916–1982) B. C. Goodpasture (1895–1977) Marshall Keeble (1878–1968) Max Lucado (born 1955) Ira North (1892–1984) Cline Paden (1919–2007) Walter Scott (1796–1861) Kenneth W. Wright (born 1945) Members Church of God International[edit] Eliseo Soriano (born 1947) Daniel Razon (born 1967) Charismatic[edit] David Du Plessis (1905–1987) Derek Prince (1915–2003) Chuck Smith (born 1927), founder of Calvary Chapel movement John Wimber (1934–1997), a founding leader of the Vineyard Movement Reinhard Bonnke (born 1940) Joyce Meyer (born 1943) Willie George, founder of Church on the Move and the Gospel Bill Show T. D. Jakes, founder and senior pastor of the Potter’s House Church in Dallas, Texas W.F. Kumuyi (born 1941) Michael A. McCain (born 1985) Founder of Kingdom Builders Assembly International Inc. The author of “Prayerology” & ” The Purpose Driven Prayer Life”. Jim Orate (born 1945) Jimmy Swaggart (born 1935) Pentecostal[edit] Alexander Boddy (1854–1930) Smith Wigglesworth (1859–1947) Bishop Charles Harrison Mason (1866-1961) William J. Seymour (1870–1922) Bishop Garfield Thomas Haywood (1880-1931) Lewi Pethrus (1884–1974) Kathryn Kuhlman (1907–1976) William Marrion Branham (1909–1965) Oral Roberts (1918-2009) David Wilkerson (1931–2011) Bernie L. Wade (born 1963) Geoffrey Kusinyi Wafula [born 1977] * Pastor Anthony Wynn [born 1960] Mark J. Sheppeard (born 1982-present) Founder and host of Faith Talk Radio Seventh-day Adventist[edit] Joseph Bates (1792 – 1872) Ellen G. White (1827-1915) John Nevins Andrews (1829 – 1883) H. M. S. Richards, Sr. (1894–1985) Mark Finley Jan Paulsen Doug Batchelor David Asscherick Dwight Nelson Wintley Phipps George Vandeman(1916-2000) Four Square Gospel[edit] Aimee Semple McPherson (1890–1944) Jack W. Hayford (born 1934)[4] James Ranger Senior Pastor of Bakersfield New Life Center Matthew Barnett Senior Pastor of Angelus Temple in Los Angelus Other Protestant[edit] Dwight Moody Dwight Moody (1837–1899) William Irvine (1863–1947), evangelist and founder of the Cooneyite and Two by Twos sects Edward Cooney (1867–1960), evangelist and early worker in the Cooneyite and Go-Preacher sects Preachers noted for secular achievements[edit] John Donne Ralph Waldo Emerson Dr John Bodkin Adams (1899–1983), a preacher among the Plymouth Brethren but arrested in 1956 for murdering two patients. Controversially found not guilty but suspected of up to 163 deaths.[8] Bill “Parson” Brownlow (1805–1877), Methodist, anti-secessionist newspaper owner and journalist, and later governor of Tennessee John Danforth (born 1936), Episcopalian, Republican Senator from Missouri. B.G. Dyess (born 1922), Baptist, Louisiana state senator and Rapides Parish voter registrar Cristóbal Diatristán de Acuña, (1597–1676), Catholic, explorer Laurence Sterne (1713–1759), Anglican, novelist Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (1787–1851) Congregationalist, deaf educator, Gallaudet University is named in his honor. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882), Unitarian, poet James Garfield (1831–1851), Disciples of Christ, U. S. President Eric Liddell (1902–1945), Baptist, Olympian featured in the movie Chariots of Fire Hugh Beaumont (1903–1984), Methodist, Television actor Jerry Clower (1926–1998), Baptist, rural humorist David Bauer, (1924–1988), Roman Catholic, hockey player and coach Fred Rogers (1928–2003), Presbyterian, children’s television host Della Reese (born 1931), non-denominational, actress Bill Moyers (born 1935), Baptist, White House Press Secretary Grady Nutt (1937–1982), Baptist, Christian comedian, Hee Haw regular (1979–82)[9] Clifton Davis (born 1945), Seventh-day Adventist, actor George Foreman (born 1949), boxer Sam Kinison (1953–1992), charismatic, comedian Mike Huckabee Baptist (2008 Presidential candidate and former governor of Arkansas)[10] Ernie Fletcher (born 1956), Baptist (former lay preacher) Governor of Kentucky Richard Rossi (born 1963) Filmmaker and musician Christopher Priest (born 1961) Baptist, comic book author and editor Reggie White (1961–2004), Baptist/Messianic (Torah-observant), football player Kirk Cameron (born 1970), evangelical, actor John Williams, Uniting Church in Australia, scientist Fictional preachers[edit] This section lists fictional ministers of religion who were notable for their preaching. This article contains embedded lists that may be poorly defined, unverified or indiscriminate. Please help to clean it up to meet Wikipedia’s quality standards. Where appropriate, incorporate items into the main body of the article. (November 2011) Literature[edit] Bishop Manuel Aringarosa, Catholic – The Da Vinci Code (later a film) Friar Lawrence, Catholic (Anglican) – Romeo and Juliet Reverend Bunting, unspecified denomination – The Invisible Man Dr. Chasuble, unspecified – The Importance of being Earnest Arthur Dimmesdale, Puritan/Congregationalist – The Scarlet Letter Paul Ford, unspecified – Pollyanna Elmer Gantry, unspecified (charismatic) – Elmer Gantry (later a film) Tim Kavanaugh, Episcopalian – At Home in Mitford (and sequels) Lankaster Merrin, Catholic – The Exorcist Father Mulcahy – M*A*S*H (later a film and a television series) Reverend Harry Powell – The Night of the Hunter (later a film) Reverend Sykes, AME – To Kill a Mockingbird Chaplain Tappman, Anabaptist Catch-22 (later a film) Film[edit] Henry Biggs, Baptist – The Preacher’s Wife Bishop Henry Broughman, unspecified (possibly Episcopalian, Methodist or Lutheran) – The Bishop’s Wife Sonny Duvall, Pentecostal – The Apostle Father Fitzgibbon, Catholic – Going My Way Graham Hess, Episcopalian – Signs Tim O’Dowd, Catholic – Going My Way Chuck O’Malley, Catholic – Going My Way and The Bells of Saint Mary’s Jonas Nightengale, unspecified (charismatic) – Leap of Faith Samuel Whitehead, Methodist – Angel in My Pocket Reverend Ford, unspecified – Pollyanna Jacob DeBarge, unspecified (probably Baptist, Pentecostal, or Charismatic) – Let it Shine 1=== Television === Alexander Anderson, Catholic Hellsing David Randolph, Charismatic, Good News Robert Alden, unspecified (possibly Lutheran or Congregationalist) – Little House on the Prairie Eric Camden, unspecified Mainline Protestant, 7th Heaven Frank Dowliing, Catholic – Father Dowling Mysteries Mr. Eko, Catholic (self-proclaimed) – Lost Matthew Fordwick, Baptist – The Waltons Reuben Gregory, unspecified – Amen Reverend Timothy Lovejoy, Presbylutheran – The Simpsons Reverend Gaylord Pierson – According to Jim Francis Xavier Reyneux (Father Ray), Catholic – Nothing Sacred Noah “Hardstep” Rivers, Catholic – Hell Town Mike Weber, Episcopalian – Soul Man Chris Stevens, Worldwide Church of Truth and Beauty, (which, like the Universal Life Church, offers at large ordination regardless of training or theological ideology. In Stevens’ case, he answered an ad in the back of Rolling Stone) – Northern Exposure Karen Stroup, Methodist – King of the Hill Daniel Webster, Episcopalian – Book of Daniel Rev. Grady Williams, Baptist – The Grady Nutt Show[11] Bishop Louie Santos – Jesus Christ “To God Be The Glory International Church” 1985, Calamba, Quezon City, Philippines. “Friends Again” – TV Program every Saturday.. Sunday Service at Cuneta Astrodome, Manila See also[edit] List of United States televangelists List of Campus Preachers List of ministers of the Universal Life Church Lists of Roman Catholics References[edit] Jump up ^ Øverland, Orm The Western Home (published by Norwegian-American Historical Association, distributed by the University of Illinois Press. 1996, Chapter 14, page 196) Jump up ^ http://www.stmarcus.com/index.html Jump up ^ http://www.timeofgrace.org ^ Jump up to: a b c Michael Duduit. “The 25 Most Influential Pastors of the Past 25 Years”. Preaching Magazine. Retrieved 2011-06-04. Jump up ^ Center for Baptist Studies Jump up ^ Michael Duduit. “The 25 Most Influential Pastors of the Past 25 Years”. Preaching Magazine. Retrieved 2011-06-04. Jump up ^ Michael Duduit. “The 25 Most Influential Pastors of the Past 25 Years”. Preaching Magazine. Retrieved 2011-06-04. Jump up ^ Cullen, Pamela V., “A Stranger in Blood: The Case Files on Dr John Bodkin Adams”, London, Elliott & Thompson, 2006, ISBN 1-904027-19-9 Jump up ^ H. Allen Anderson: Grady Lee Nutt from the Handbook of Texas Online. Retrieved January 29, 2009. Jump up ^ Gretel C. Kovach, Sarah Elkins, Suzanne Smalley and Sarah Kliff. “A Pastor’s True Calling.” Newsweek December 17, 2007. Retrieved January 6, 2008. Jump up ^ “The Grady Nutt Show” Yahoo! TV., Note from Rowland Croucher: Dear friends, Here’s a list of preachers who have inspired more preaching-pastors than any others in the 20th century. I’ve read sermons from all of them – and adapted quite a few for my own preaching… [If you’re interested in listening to James Stewart (‘The Wind of the Spirit’) and W E Sangster (‘The Church’), I have an MP3 with these two famous sermons on it, plus a lot of John Mark Ministries’ seminars/preaching/powerpoints. It also has a few rare F W Boreham sermons and radio talks. Just $30 AUD including airmail postage anywhere. Email me c/- the contact button at the top of this page, or directly via rcroucher@gmail.com]. ***** Michael Duduit, Editor, Preaching The past year (1999?) has produced an avalanche of “best of the century” and “best of the millennium” stories and listings in the media. From the 100 most important events of the century to the 50 best entertainers to the 25 best athletes, it seems that there is a list for every interest. Such listings are more than speculative fancies. A historical rarity such as the event we are about to face on December 31 offers a prime opportunity to look back and consider those persons who have made such a difference in our lives and in our world. Thus it is with preaching. As a way to celebrate the end of a century and the start of a new millennium — and to celebrate the committed Christian preachers who have so influenced our calling and our faith communities — Preaching magazine undertook an effort to identify the great preachers of our century and of the past thousand years. The search began with a request to our readers to nominate their own favorites. The result was hundreds of nominations of preachers who have made an impact beyond the lives of their own churches. Among the outstanding preachers who were nominated were names like F.W. Boreham, Oswald Hoffman, Walter Maier, John Maxwell, Harold John Ockenga, Fulton Sheen, and many more. Based on those nominations, a list of 27 names was prepared and sent to Preaching’s Board of Contributing Editors. That group was invited to identify and rank (1-10) their own list of the century’s great preachers; they also had an opportunity to suggest names which had not been included on the original list. Their rankings were then tallied according to the rankings made by the contributing editors (giving increased weight based on the higher rankings) and the number of times a person was listed in each editor’s “top ten.” The result is in the list provided below. For those who are interested in the names that didn’t quite make the top ten, here’s the “second ten” in the order they were ranked: 11. Leslie Weatherhead 12. George W. Truett 13. R.G. Lee 14. Norman Vincent Peale 15. Peter Marshall 16. E. Stanley Jones 17. Donald Grey Barnhouse 18. Ralph Sockman 19. W.A. Criswell 20. Gardner C. Taylor ~~ What makes a preacher “great”? For purposes of this listing, the primary characteristic seems to be the influence that preacher had on the church and on the wider society. For example, while several persons commented that they would not be supportive of many of his theological positions, they could not deny the powerful influence Harry Emerson Fosdick exerted on the character of preaching in the modern era. It is almost certain that no reader would identify the exact same ten preachers in making his or her own list; even given the same list of names, the order in which they appeared would vary widely from person to person. Yet one thing cannot be denied: every person on the list below has made a significant impact on countless lives, on the church, and on their fellow preachers. 1. James S. Stewart (1896-1990) Most readers will be surprised that Stewart’s name appears at the top of such a list, though few would deny he belongs in this distinguished company. The gifted Scottish preacher taught New Testament at the University of Edinburgh, was Chaplain to the Queen in Scotland, and served in 1963-1964 as Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. Stewart was committed to expository preaching, and preached with an earnestness and energy that was warmly received by his listeners. Much of Stewart’s influence on American preaching was through his writing and lectures. His books such as Heralds of God (the published version of his Warrack Lectures at Edinburgh) and A Faith to Proclaim (the published version of his Lyman Beecher Lectures on Preaching at Yale) have inspired tens of thousands of preachers to strive for greater effectiveness in their proclamation of God’s Word. As Stewart challenged in A Faith to Proclaim: “‘I, yet not I, but Christ.’ To be thus taken command of, so that our testimony, when we go out to speak of Christ, is not ours at all, but Christ’s self-testimony — this is our vocation and the hope of our ministry. It is God’s great promise and demand to every preacher of the Word. Here, in all reverence and humility, the disciple may take upon his lips the saying of his Lord: ‘To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world.’” ********** “Born in 1893, the son of a popular Bible teacher in the YMCA movement, James Stewart was an acclaimed preacher both in his native Scotland and also in America. He served as Pastor of three Church of Scotland congregations, and then joined the faculty of New College, the divinity school of the University of Edinburgh. Though I never had the privilege of hearing Stewart preach in person, I have listened, spell-bound, to some taped sermons, and have underlined many a memorable statement in those I have read in my library. He was a preacher’s preacher, possessing gifts most of us can only dream of. I appreciate his ministry for many reasons — his sermons were thorough-ly biblical (he argued persuasively for expository preaching), erudite without being stuffy, eloquent though not ornate, moving but not cheaply emotional, eminently practical, often conscience-piercing, and above all, God-exalting. Yet the thing I appreciate most is his commitment to the mandate of world evangelization. In his own preaching he did not hesitate to call men and women to personal faith in Christ, and he challenged his students and others to do the work of the evangelist. In his Beecher Lectures in 1953 he declared with characteristic directness, that there is “no place today for a Church that is not aflame with the Spirit who is the Lord and Giver of life, nor any value in a theology which is not passionately missionary” (A Faith to Proclaim, p.12). In an earlier book consisting of lectures on preaching originally given to his students, he wrote that “no Church is anything more than a pathetic pietistic backwater unless it is first and fundamentally and all the time a world missionary Church” (Heralds of God, p. 30). (William Hogan, Professor Emeritus of Preaching, Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, MS) *********** 2. Billy Graham (1918- ) A dynamic preacher and evangelist, Billy Graham — through the televising of mass crusades — has proclaimed the gospel to more persons than any other preacher in history. In the process, Graham has become a “national chaplain” for Americans and a world citizen and ambassador for Christ. Graham’s preaching is simple and straightforward, filled with illustrations drawn from the day’s headlines. And each sermon is focused intently on a single purpose: to draw men and women to saving faith in Jesus Christ. Over a ministry about to enter its seventh decade, God has blessed Graham’s preaching and has used his faithfulness and integrity to draw hundreds of thousands to respond to the call of Christ. Through his long life and ministry, Graham has built a remarkable organization which today reaches far beyond sponsoring mass evangelistic crusades. Through television and movies, radio, books and magazines, and a network of related activities, this anointed preacher has faithfully proclaimed Christ across America and around the globe. ********** “The numbers speak of greatness and complexity. He has preached in person to more people than any human being who has ever lived. While his pulpit started in white-frame churches, trailer parks, and circus tents it rapidly moved to cathedrals, stadiums, and other arenas which are among the world’s largest public gathering places. He’s been called “America’s Pastor” and has ministered personally to several American presidents. Over 100 million people have listened to his sermons. Almost 3 million of those people have responded to his famous “invitations.” But when all is said and done, Billy Graham is just a simple man with a simple message. Raised on a North Carolina dairy farm, Graham’s pious parents were old-fashioned enough to believe in corporal punishment, mandatory daily Bible readings, and regular lectures on clean living. And while numerous icons of morality have come and gone, for 50 years Graham has endured both criticism and applause with humility, integrity, and genuineness. Simplicity truly characterizes his message. Through all the accolades he has presented a strong Christianity with a big God, a loving Savior, a hot hell, and a glorious heaven. Yet his message has remained incredibly simple: every person is sinful before God, a predicament that can turn to forgiveness only through faith in Jesus Christ. He has communicated it through simple phrases like “The Bible says . . .” and “You must be born again” that have riveted themselves into our hearts and minds. His delivery has been even more simple, characterized by crispness and clarity that even the youngest of listeners is able to grasp. Thank God for a preacher who takes Jesus at His Word. Thank God for a simple preacher. Thank God for Billy Graham.” (Jim Shaddix, Professor of Preaching, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary) *********** 3. George Buttrick (1892-1980) An English-born Congregational preacher who served nearly thirty years as pastor of New York’s Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church, Buttrick succeeded Henry Sloane Coffin. From that distinguished pulpit Buttrick began a teaching career at Union Theological Seminary, then as Preacher to the University at Harvard. Buttrick exerted a profound influence on a generation of American preachers. He wrote many books and articles, and twice delivered the prestigious Lyman Beecher Lectures on Preaching at Yale. In his preaching, Buttrick sought to lift up Christ, and he believed only that preaching which was centered on the cross would impact eternity. As he said in his Yale lectures: “In a Cathedral at Lucca there is a crucifix said to have been carved by Nicodemus — so clumsily carved that he left it in despair. But (says the story) in that despair an angel came while he slept and made the crucifix true both to the eye of the craftsman and the eye of the worshipper. A Spirit can thus redeem our poor preaching of the Cross. To such preaching we must pledge ourselves. Let the history of the Church be for a witness that power has visited the Church in such preaching, and that power has ebbed when the Cross has been forgotten. In any event love compels us to cry — it is all such preaching need hope or wish to say — ‘Behold the Man!’” ********** “During his lifetime, three generations of seminarians sought Buttrick out not only as a man who knew homiletics, but more than that one who could really preach. He served brief congregational pastorates in Vermont and Illinois before he moved to Buffalo, NY, to serve the First Presbyterian Church. From there he moved to the Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church in New York City, which was to be his most prominent pulpit. In the mid-fifties he began his teaching career, first at Union Theological Seminary and later Harvard. His brilliant career in homiletics was not free of all handicaps. He was considered not to have the dramatic sort of voice that generated pulpit electricity. In fact, he said of himself that he had an “odd sandy voice, the voice of an old nurse” (Alphabet of Grace, 1970, p. 44). Nonetheless he was forceful in the pulpit and became a master at sermon construction and orderly, powerful discourse. His discipline and talent came in time to be ranked alongside Harry Emerson Fosdick and Paul Scherer. His teaching influenced all sorts of notable pulpiteers, including Frederick Buechner. His most popular courses had to do with the outlining of sermons. He believed that a sermon’s architecture should render the sermon pleasing, beautiful, orderly and useful. His love of literature and the arts informed his clean, simple sermon outlines that intersected all of life. His sermons abounded with literary quotations. Buttrick believed a sermon should always bear the kind of truth that saves. Once, when his church members asked him to preach more like a fundamentalist, with fundamentalist truth, he replied, “A telephone directory is literally true, and the parable of the prodigal son is not; but the telephone book is not salvation, whereas that story of human folly and divine mercy is like a daybreak on our darkness.” (The Sign of a Savior, Dec. 23, 1928). His poignant love of communication and his devotion to Biblical truth, was his gift to preaching in the 20th century. (Calvin Miller, Professor of Preaching, Beeson Divinity School, Birmingham, AL) ********** 4. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968) King was a gifted African-American preacher and civil rights leader whose sermonic appeals for justice and personal activism helped change the course of American life. His prophetic words and actions resulted in his recognition as a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He was tragically assassinated in 1968. Though his theological training was provided in a context of theological liberalism, as King’s ministry progressed — as pastor of Montgomery’s Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, then Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church — his preaching grew increasingly more evangelical and biblical. His sermons became more Christ-centered, with a growing emphasis on the cross. Steeped in the rhetorical traditions of the African-American church, King displayed gifts in the pulpit and the political arena that made him one of the most compelling speakers of the century. It is important to remember that the leader of the most profound American social movement of this century described himself as “fundamentally a clergyman, a Baptist preacher.” ********** “Martin Luther King, Jr. was a man of great passion, devotion, and humor. His humorous side is not frequently discussed, and though often portrayed by the media to be a rather serious, no nonsense individual, in reality he was the epitome of humor. However, while he could greatly amuse a select group of friends in private, it was his passion and devotion that caught the international spotlight. From his family he inherited a sense of mission that encompassed him as a preacher and a Civil Rights leader. A major source of King’s theology was the African-American church. Perhaps the greatest gift willed to King from the African-American church was that of an indomitable faith in God which reverberated through his sermons and speeches. Of the many career opportunities King could have pursued, he chose to take a full time pastorate. Above everything else, Martin King considered himself a preacher of the gospel. Apparently King was often disappointed that he was not primarily seen as a preacher. King was a poet and an artist in the pulpit. He saw no incompatibility between biblical preaching and preaching on relevant social issues. That is only part of his legacy to modern preachers. King has helped ministers to recover the relevance of preaching for our day, to motivate Christians to blend their theology with their ethics, and to translate their faith in God in the social, economic and political struggle, while not being afraid to use philosophy and formal reasoning. Ultimately King breathed life back into many preachers simply through his profound approach of addressing the audience cardiologically and colonially. Just as his passion, devotion, and humor sprang from his head as well as his mind, so he directed them and his message to the head and minds of others. (Robert Smith, Professor of Preaching, Beeson Divinity School, Birmingham, AL) ********** 5. Harry Emerson Fosdick (1878-1969) One of the most influential preachers of the century, Fosdick’s ministry coincided with the growth of radio, contributing to his national prominence. As pastor of New York’s Riverside Church, he was minister to the Rockefellers and other prominent business and civic leaders, yet he was known as an advocate of social change. Considered by many to be the finest pulpit orator of his generation, Fosdick has had a continuing influence on the shape of American preaching into the present day. He was a practitioner of what he called “life situation preaching,” a homiletical model which focused the sermon on human need and climaxed in a call to human action. Though his homiletical approach grew out of his own liberal theological views, his model gave a new shape to American preaching, including much evangelical preaching. ********** “My first introduction to Harry Emerson Fosdick was at Stetson University in Deland, Florida, while a student there. That was back in the days when chapel was required of students. Preachers from around the area were invited to speak. This was a good education for a young man preparing for the ministry because we heard many sermon styles and many forms of delivery. On one particular Wednesday morning, I was arrested out of my boredom during chapel by a particularly stimulating sermon brought to us by one of the leading “Fundamentalists” in our area. This sermon was thoughtful, incisive, communicated quite well, and used scripture in an unusually intelligent way. It was not like so many sermons I had endured in which the preacher had laboriously beaten us over the head with unexamined propositions, but rather it was focused directly upon our needs, took us by the hand and led us in to the scriptures as the answer to the needs the pastor was discussing. After chapel, I was discussing the sermon with one of my professors. He acknowledged that it was an exceptionally good sermon. But he commented to me that it was unusual to hear that sermon coming from that preacher because the preacher had spent a great deal of his ministery fighting “modernism.” Then he went on to tell me the other reason the sermon was so unusual; it was one of Harry Emerson Fosdick’s sermons, and Fosdick was the leading “modernist” of the time. He proceeded to go to his library, pulled out a book by Fosdick and opened it to the exact page and showed me the sermon. I had trouble putting all this together but I did know there was something about this sermon that was different. Later in seminary as we began to study great preachers, I discovered Fosdick as an oasis in a dry desert. I read everything by Fosdick I could get my hands on. I saw in Fosdick, not a source of sermons but a dimension of preaching that had been withheld from me in my early development. Here were delightful subjects, well researched, magnificently focused and artistically presented, from an obvious preacher who was profoundly committed to the Christian gospel and to the church of Jesus Christ. Like other preachers, I have stolen my share of Fosdick’s sermons. I’ll admit it, but so has every other preacher, whatever his theological stripe may be. But there comes a time when you can’t live off another person’s work. You can’t be David in Saul’s armor. Fosdick taught me to lighten up, not to take myself too seriously, but to take the gospel and the preaching of the gospel very seriously, and to communicate. For this, each time I step into the pulpit, I know that in one way or another, my congregation owes a great debt to him. (William L. Self, Pastor, Johns Creek Baptist Church, Alpharetta, GA) ********** 6. G. Campbell Morgan (1863-1945) Called by many “the prince of expositors,” G. Campbell Morgan helped influence the shape of evangelical preaching on both sides of the Atlantic. Born in England, raised in Wales, Morgan lacked formal education but his absolute confidence in scripture made him an avid student and interpreter of the Word. This skilled expository preacher served several English congregations before an itinerant ministry in the U.S. (1901-1904). From 1904 to 1917 he served as pastor of London’s Westminster Chapel, a church which experienced unparalleled growth under his leadership. Following more years in America, Morgan returned to Westminister Chapel in 1933 (at age 69) and served for a decade during one of the most dangerous periods of Britain’s history. Morgan’s love of the Bible shone through his sermons, which were carefully prepared and then presented with an anointed intensity. His successor as pastor of Westminster Chapel, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, said of Morgan that “preaching was the supreme passion of his life.” ********** “The first and best advise I ever received on the subject of preparing a sermon recalled the fundamental design of G. Campbell Morgan’s expository method: “Read the text. Read it again and again. Read it 25 to 50 times. The whole book. In context. Only then will you understand the text and be ready to preach it.” Though I didn’t know it then, that recommendation expressed the expositional approach to preaching the Bible that Morgan practiced, a model that has influenced thousands of theologically conservative Bible teachers and preachers. Campbell died four years before I was born. I never heard him preach. Yet because the influence of his popular preaching, extensive itinerant teaching, and prolific writing still lives, I feel as if I have heard him time and again in the sermons of others. They have studied the text in context, analyzed, synthesized, and expounded the truth of Scripture with clear and compelling arguments. That’s the model of preaching I grew up on and have tried to master. Two stories about Morgan have especially influenced me. The first was how he was rejected for formal ministry because his preaching showed so little potential. In the dark days that followed his father reminded him, “rejected on earth . . . accepted in heaven.” God will be the final judge of our gift. What a relief. What a challenge. Second, when his studies in theology and science led to doubts about the truth of the Scriptures, Campbell put away all his books except The Book. His primary text and tool became the Bible. The Bible, first and foremost, gives authority to what we proclaim. God’s ideas, not mine. What a relief. What a challenge. While changing times demand changing styles of preaching, the first and best advise to any preacher remains, “read the text.” (Timothy S. Warren, Professor of Pastoral Ministries, Dallas Theological Seminary) ********** 7. William Edwin Sangster (1900-1960) A strongly evangelical Methodist preacher, he served for sixteen years as pastor of London’s Westminster Central Hall, where he preached weekly to 3,000 souls. During World War II he had the largest Sunday-evening congregation in London, filling the 2,500-seat hall, and he opened the large basement as a bomb shelter for those in need. At different points in his ministry he succeeded two of the most popular Methodist preachers in Britain (Leslie Weatherhead and Dinsdale T. Young). He concluded his ministry as head of the home mission department of the Methodist Church, before his deterioration and death because of progressive muscular atrophy. Sangster combined evangelical intensity with a brilliant mind and gifted use of language. As Leslie Weatherhead once described one of Sangster’s books of sermons, “No chapter finishes by making you say, ‘What a clever writer Sangster is.’ They all make you say, ‘What a wonderful Savior Jesus is.’” ********** “It isn’t easy to say how much the ethos of British Methodism shaped W. E. Sangster and how much he shaped it. Suffice it to say that his sermons exemplify the best of that strand of homiletics in the 20th century. Though Sangster died many years before I became a minister in the Manchester and Salford Methodist Mission, I immediately recognized characteristics of his method in the sermons I heard others preach, and in the values and lifestyle of fellow clergy. The product of a working-class family, Sangster was educated in London and Birmingham, and served in the army during World War I. He had served several churches before his appointment to Westminster Central Hall in 1939. A man of the people, he literally lived with the people, moving his family into a community bomb shelter created in the church basement during the war. Sangster’s preaching was orthodox, grounded in Scripture but not necessarily expository, and called listeners to action as well as reflection. A gifted storyteller, his sermon illustrations range from accounts of the desolation of war-ravaged cities or observations about drunkenness to quotations from Matthew Arnold and John Bunyan. His more doctrinal sermons can perhaps be likened to the hymnody of Charles Wesley, about which it has been said that whatever earthly topic they begin with, they end in heaven. Sangster’s sermons look forward to God’s future, encouraging the listener to trust God’s promises. The timely references in his messages may date him, yet aspects of his method provide a model for preaching in the post-modern world: knowing the world of the listener, taking the listener’s experience seriously, and embodying the hope we have in Christ.” (Carol M. Noren, Professor of Preaching, North Park Theological Seminary, Chicago, IL) ********** 8. John R.W. Stott (1921-2011 ) A favorite preacher among evangelicals around the globe, John Stott was Rector Emeritus of All Souls Church in London and Director of the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity. He served at All Souls Church as assistant curate (1945-50), as Rector (1950-75), and as Rector Emeritus since 1975. He was appointed a Chaplain to the Queen from 1959 to 1991. Since his retirement, Stott invested much of his ministry in working with pastors, church leaders and students in the Third World. He was the author of over 40 books, including Basic Christianity and The Cross of Christ. In his book I Believe in Preachin
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Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, Revelation, List of biblical names From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Hitchcock analysis of Holy Bible 1871 Smith’s Bible Dictionary 1863 Easton’s Bible Dictionary 1894 Nave’s Topical Bible 1905 This page introduces a list of about 2,600 proper names with their meanings from the Bible, mainly compiled from the 19th century public domain resources of Hitchcock’s Bible Names Dictionary as part of Hitchcock’s New and Complete Analysis of the Holy Bible written by Roswell Dwight Hitchcock[1][2] and Dictionary of the Bible by William R. Smith.[3] Most of the male and female names and their definitions can also be found in Herbert Lockyer’s reference books All the Men of the Bible[4] and All the Women of the Bible.[5] Most of the divine names and their definitions can also be found in Lockyer’s All the Divine Names and Titles in the Bible.[6] Many of the biblical names can also be found in Baker’s Evangelical Dictionary, Easton’s Bible Dictionary, Nave’s Topical Bible and Torrey’s New Topical Textbook.[7] Others can be found in the Catholic Encyclopedia and the new Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge (Dictionary edition).[8] The biblical names pertaining just to the Old Testament can all be found in Joan Comay’s reference book titled Who’s Who in the Old Testament.[9] Other Biblical name definitions of places, cities, countries, angels, gods, mountains and Hebrew names can be found in Nancy M. Tischler’s encyclopedia All Things in the Bible: an Encyclopedia of the Biblical World.[10] Contents [hide] 1 Significance of names 2 List of biblical names 3 See also 4 References 5 Footnotes 6 Further reading 7 Related sayings Significance of names[edit] Many names describe nations, people, and ancient history. Some describe expressions of hopes, revelations of divine purposes, and prophecies of the future. Some are part of genealogical histories, as it was common in Jewish customs to keep a family history. Sometimes names indicated certain circumstances with their birth or family line. Characteristics and traits of people were an important aspect of names in ancient Israel. For example the name Nabal means “senseless and fool”, and Abigail indicated that this is what her husband amounted to (1 Sam 25:25). Sometimes names pointed to occupations, sometimes to a symbolic or a prophetic feature. Sometimes place names have become personal names (e.g. the name Eden, from the Garden of Eden). Sometimes names were given to show family relationships (e.g. uncle, father). Names sometimes had a special meaning (e.g. praise, additional, rebellion, bitterness). Sometimes names were of a type of plant or had charactistics of natural phenomenon (i.e. thunder, lightning, rain). Sometimes names were related to animals or their characteristics.[11] Before the Protestant Reformation the most common names were Adam, Benjamin, Elias, Daniel, David, Joseph, Samson, and Solomon. After the Reformation names like Aaron, Elijah, Joshua, Moses, and Nathaniel were added to mainstream popularity. Saint names associated with the Roman Catholic Church were used less after the Reformation. Maher-shalal-hash-baz is the longest name in the Bible, and was much used as a given name. Mary and John are the most used of the Christian names.[12] List of biblical names[edit] Note that “names” refers to any noun, which may be: people, places, cities, countries, angels, gods, mountains, etc. Meanings of the names are not always definite or clear, but a possible meaning has been provided in every case. Most of the meanings come from Hebrew, while the others come from Greek, Aramaic, or Latin. A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – L – M – N – O – P – Q – R – S – T – U – V – Y – Z List of biblical names starting with A List of biblical names starting with B List of biblical names starting with C List of biblical names starting with D List of biblical names starting with E List of biblical names starting with F List of biblical names starting with G List of biblical names starting with H List of biblical names starting with I List of biblical names starting with J List of biblical names starting with K List of biblical names starting with L List of biblical names starting with M List of biblical names starting with N List of biblical names starting with O List of biblical names starting with P List of biblical names starting with Q List of biblical names starting with R List of biblical names starting with S List of biblical names starting with T List of biblical names starting with U List of biblical names starting with V List of biblical names starting with Y List of biblical names starting with Z See also[edit] Genealogy of the Bible List of major biblical figures List of minor biblical figures List of names for the biblical nameless Modern name for Biblical place names References[edit] Comay, Joan, Who’s Who in the Old Testament, Oxford University Press, 1971, ISBN 0-19-521029-8 Lockyer, Herbert, All the men of the Bible, Zondervan Publishing House (Grand Rapids, Michigan), 1958 Lockyer, Herbert, All the women of the Bible, Zondervan Publishing 1988, ISBN 0-310-28151-2 Lockyer, Herbert, All the Divine Names and Titles in the Bible, Zondervan Publishing 1988, ISBN 0-310-28041-9 Tischler, Nancy M., All things in the Bible: an encyclopedia of the biblical world , Greenwood Publishing, Westport, Conn. : 2006 ISBN 0-313-33082-4 Footnotes[edit] Jump up ^ Roswell Dwight Hitchcock, Washburn Professor of Church History in Union Theological Seminary. Bible Names Dictionary, 1869, New York City Jump up ^ Hitchcock’s Bible Names Dictionary at Christian Classics Ethereal Library of Calvin College for additional references and sources Jump up ^ William R. Smith, Dictionary of the Bible Jump up ^ Herbert Lockyer, All the Men of the Bible, pp. 19–369 Jump up ^ Lockyer, All the Women of the Bible, ISBN 0-310-28151-2, pp. 11–320 Jump up ^ Lockyer, All the Divine Names and Titles in the Bible, ISBN 0-310-28041-9, pp. 16–368 Jump up ^ Bible Study Tools Jump up ^ Bible Study Tools library Jump up ^ Joan Comay, Who’s Who in the Old Testament, ISBN 978-0-415-26031-2. pp. 1-398 Jump up ^ Nancy M. Tischler, All Things in the Bible: an Encyclopedia of the Biblical World. ISBN 978-0-313-33082-7. 808 pp. Jump up ^ Lockyer, pp. 11-14 Jump up ^ Lockyer, p. 14 Further reading[edit] Bible Study Tools Nave’s Topical Bible Smith’s Bible Dictionary Easton’s Bible Dictionary Catholic Encyclopedia 1917 Torrey’s New Topical Textbook Baker’s Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge (Dictionary edition), List of major biblical figures From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Bible is a canonical collection of texts considered sacred in Judaism or Christianity. Different religious groups include different books within their canons, in different orders, and sometimes divide or combine books, or incorporate additional material into canonical books. Christian Bibles range from the sixty-six books of the Protestant canon to the eighty-one books of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church canon. Contents [hide] 1 Hebrew Bible 1.1 Prophets 1.2 Kings 1.3 Priests 1.4 Tribes of Israel 2 New Testament 2.1 Jesus and his relatives 2.2 Christian Apostles of Jesus 2.3 Priests 2.4 Prophets 2.5 Other believers 2.6 Secular rulers 3 See also 4 References Hebrew Bible[edit] [hide] v t e Adam to David according to the Hebrew Bible Creation to Flood Adam Seth Enos Kenan Mahalalel Jared Enoch Methuselah Lamech Noah Shem Cain line Adam Cain Enoch Irad Mehujael Methusael Lamech Tubal-cain Patriarchs after Flood Arpachshad Shelah Eber Peleg Reu Serug Nahor Terah Abraham Isaac Jacob Nationhood to Kingship Judah Perez Hezron Ram Amminadab Nahshon Salmon Boaz Obed Jesse David Prophets[edit] [hide] v t e Prophets in the Hebrew Bible Pre-Patriarchs (Bible) Abel Kenan Enoch Noah (rl) Patriarchs and Matriarchs Abraham Isaac Jacob Joseph Sarah Rebecca Rachel Leah Israelite prophets in the Torah Moses (rl) Aaron Miriam Eldad & Medad Phinehas Prophets mentioned in the Former Prophets Joshua Deborah Gideon Eli Elkanah Hannah Abigail Samuel Gad Nathan David Solomon Jeduthun Ahijah Elijah Elisha Shemaiah Iddo Hanani Jehu Micaiah Jahaziel Eliezer Zechariah ben Jehoiada Huldah Major Prophets Isaiah (rl) Jeremiah Ezekiel Daniel (rl) Minor Prophets Hosea Joel Amos Obadiah Jonah (rl) Micah Nahum Habakkuk Zephaniah Haggai Zechariah Malachi Noahide prophets Beor Balaam Job (rl) Other prophets Amoz Beeri Baruch Agur Uriah Buzi Mordecai Esther (rl) Oded Azariah Italics denote that the status as a prophet is not universally accepted. rl are articles dealing with the prophet within Rabbinic Literature. Kings[edit] [hide] v t e Rulers of Ancient Israel Pre-dynastic Abimelech United Monarchy Saul Ish-boseth David Solomon Israel (Northern Kingdom) Jeroboam I Nadab Baasha Elah Zimri Tibni Omri Ahab Ahaziah Jehoram Jehu Jehoahaz Jehoash Jeroboam II Zechariah Shallum Menahem Pekahiah Pekah Hoshea Judah (Southern Kingdom) Rehoboam Abijam Asa Jehoshaphat Jehoram Ahaziah Athaliah Jehoash Amaziah Uzziah Jotham Ahaz Hezekiah Manasseh Amon Josiah Jehoahaz Jehoiakim Jeconiah Zedekiah Hasmonean dynasty Simon Maccabaeus John Hyrcanus Aristobulus I Alexander Jannaeus Salome Alexandra Hyrcanus II Aristobulus II Antigonus II Mattathias Herodian dynasty Herod the Great Archelaus Antipas Philip the Tetrarch Salome I Agrippa Agrippa II Post-Second Temple era Simon bar Kokhba Italics indicate a disputed reign or non-royal title Priests[edit] Aaron Elazar Eli Phinehas Tribes of Israel[edit] According to the Book of Genesis, the Israelites were descendants of the sons of Jacob, who was renamed Israel after wrestling with an angel. His twelve male children become the ancestors of the Twelve Tribes of Israel. Asher Benjamin Dan Gad Issachar Joseph, which was split into two tribes descended from his sons: Tribe of Ephraim Tribe of Menasheh Judah Levi Naphtali Reuben Simeon Zebulun New Testament[edit] Jesus and his relatives[edit] Jesus Mary, mother of Jesus Joseph Brothers of Jesus James the Just Christian Apostles of Jesus[edit] The Twelve:[1] Peter (Simon Kefa) Andrew (Simon’s brother) James son of Zebedee John son of Zebedee (aka John the Evangelist) Philip Bartholomew Thomas also known as “Doubting Thomas” Matthew James son of Alphaeus Judas son of James (aka Thaddeus or Judas Lebbaeus) Simon the Canaanite Judas Iscariot (the traitor) Others: Paul[2] Titus Matthias[3] Mary Magdalene Priests[edit] Caiaphas, high priest Annas, first high priest of Roman Judea Zechariah, father of John the Baptist Prophets[edit] Agabus Anna (Bible) Simeon (Gospel of Luke) John the Baptist Other believers[edit] Apollos Aquila Barnabas Dionysius the Areopagite Epaphras, fellow prisoner of Paul (Philemon 1:23), fellow worker (Colossians 4:12-13) Joseph of Arimathea Lazarus Luke Mark Martha Mary Magdalene Mary, sister of Martha Nicodemus Onesimus Philemon Priscilla Silas Sopater Stephen, first martyr Timothy Secular rulers[edit] See also: Herod Herod the Great Herod Antipas, called “Herod the Tetrarch” or “Herod” in the Gospels and in Acts 4:27 Pontius Pilate Agrippa I, called “King Herod” or “Herod” in Acts 12 Felix governor of Judea who was present at the trial of Paul, and his wife Drusilla in Acts 24:24 [show] v t e New Testament people See also[edit] Portal icon Christianity portal Portal icon Judaism portal Portal icon Bible portal Bible List of biblical names – long alphabetical list of names with their meanings List of Jewish Biblical figures List of minor Biblical figures – long list of minor figures with brief explanations & Bible references List of burial places of biblical figures, List of Christian preachers From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Charles Spurgeon, the “Prince of Preachers”, in action, by Ape. The following is a list of Christian clergy who are notable for their preaching in various settings. Contents [hide] 1 Inter-Denominational 2 Catholic 3 Lutheran 4 Reformed 5 ONE GOD Believer Christian Churches 6 Presbyterian 7 Anglican/Episcopalian 8 Puritan/Congregationalist/Nonconformist 9 Baptist 10 Methodist 11 Church of Christ 12 Members Church of God International 13 Charismatic 14 Pentecostal 15 Seventh-day Adventist 16 Four Square Gospel 17 Other Protestant 18 Preachers noted for secular achievements 19 Fictional preachers 19.1 Literature 19.2 Film 20 See also 21 References Inter-Denominational[edit] Joseph Wayne Parker (born 1988) early on served as layman in Anglican Diocese of San Joaquin, served as an Associate Pastor at a Charismatic Church in Bakersfield, Currently assist in Baptist church transitional leadership ministry. Catholic[edit] Portrait of Hortensio Félix Paravicino painted by El Greco circa 1609. Bishop Sheen Ignatius of Antioch (35–107) (also Eastern Orthodox Church) Polycarp (69–155) (also the Eastern Orthodox Church) John Chrysostom (347–407) (also Eastern Orthodox Church) Bernard of Clairvaux (1090–1153) Henry of Lausanne d. 1148, heretical, opposed by Bernard Dominic of Guzmán (1170-1221) (founder of the Order of Preachers) John Bromyard (died c. 1352) Johannes Tauler (1300–1361), German (Dominican) mystic Jan Huss (1369–1415) (condemned and executed as a heretic) Bernardino of Siena (1380–1444), Franciscan Giovanni da Capistrano (1386–1456), Franciscan James of the Marches (1391–1476), Franciscan Girolamo Savonarola (1452–1498), Dominican, also executed as a heretic Petrus Canisius (1521–1597), Jesuit preacher of the Counter-Reformation in the German-speaking lands Hortensio Félix Paravicino, Trinitarian brother, preacher to the court Philip II of Spain, and poet Jacques-Benigne Bossuet (1627–1704), whose sermons are classics of French prose Louis Bourdaloue (1632–1704) Jesuit preacher of the age of Louis XIV Jean Baptiste Massillon (1663–1742), Oratorian John Henry Newman (1801–1890), converted from Anglicanism Bernard Vaughan SJ (1847–1922) Charles Coughlin (1891–1975) Bishop Fulton Sheen (1895–1975) Pope John Paul II, (1920–2005) Lutheran[edit] Martin Luther Martin Luther, former Augustinian monk (1483–1547) Philipp Melanchthon (1497–1560) Lars Levi Laestadius (1800–1861) C. F. W. Walther (1811–1887) Bernt B. Haugan (born 1862), Lutheran minister, politician, and temperance leader[1] Martin Niemöller (1892–1984) Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906–1945) J. A. O. Preus II (1920–1994), former President of the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod during the Seminex affair Gerald B. Kieschnick (born 1943), former President of the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod Dr Wallace Schulz (born c. 1945), former host of The Lutheran Hour and former second vice President of the LCMS Mark Hanson (born 1946) Ken Klaus, current host of the The Lutheran Hour David Benke (born 1946) Don Wharton (born 1951), Christian musician and Lutheran minister Mark Jeske (born 1952), Pastor of St. Marcus Lutheran Church (Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod) in Milwaukee, WI, and the preacher for Time of Grace[2][3] Dr. Walter A. Maier (1893–1950), host of The Lutheran Hour from 1930–1950 Matthew C. Harrison (born 1962), current President of LCMS John Warwick Montgomery (born 1931), Lutheran apologist Gerhard Forde (September 10, 1927 – August 9, 2005) Rod Rosenbladt (born c. 1942) Reformed[edit] John Calvin Huldrych Zwingli, (1484–1531) John Calvin, (1509–1564) ONE GOD Believer Christian Churches[edit] Bishop Louie R. Santos Jesus Christ “To God Be The Glory International., “Friends Again” TV Program Presbyterian[edit] John Knox, (1513–1572) Peter Marshall, (1903–1949) Ian Paisley (born 1926) Frederick Buechner (born 1926) Timothy J. Keller (born 1950)[4] R.C. Sproul (born 1939) Douglas Wilson (born 1953) Anglican/Episcopalian[edit] Stained glass window featuring Archbishop Cranmer and the Oxford Martyrs John Wesley Nicholas Ridley, (died 1555) one of the Oxford Martyrs Hugh Latimer, (1470–1555) another of the Oxford Martyrs (1470–1555) Thomas Cranmer, (1489–1556), Archbishop of Canterbury and an Oxford Martyr Lancelot Andrewes, (1555–1626) John Donne (1572–1631) also a famous poet John Tillotson, (1630–1694) John Wesley (1703–1791), remained an Anglican priest until death. George Whitefield (1714–1770), remained an Anglican priest until death. Phillips Brooks, (1835–1893) Bishop of Massachusetts N. T. Wright, (born 1948) former Bishop of Durham, Rt Revd Professor, St. Andrews Michael Bruce Curry (born 1953) Bishop of North Carolina Lindsay Urwin (born 1956) former Bishop of Horsham,now Administrator of the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham Edward Thomas Parker (born 1950-Died 2009) Layman in the Anglican Diocese of San Joaquin until death. Puritan/Congregationalist/Nonconformist[edit] Jonathan Edwards Robert Abbot, (c. 1588 – c. 1622) John Davenport, (1597–1670) John Harvard, (1607–1638), benefactor of New College in Massachusetts which later changed its name in his honor Joseph Alleine (c. 1634–1668) Matthew Henry, (1662–1714) Cotton Mather, (1663–1728) Jonathan Edwards (1703–1758) Peter Taylor Forsyth, (1848-1921) G. Campbell Morgan, (1863–1945) Martyn Lloyd-Jones, (1899–1981) Baptist[edit] File:Billy Graham bw photo, AprWilliam Miller (February 15, 1782 – December 20, 1849 il 11, 1966.jpg Billy Graham Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Roger Williams, (1603–1684) John Bunyan, (1628–1688) Benjamin Keach (1640–1704) John Gill (1697–1771) William Miller (1782 – 1849) William Garrett Lewis (c. 1834–1885) C. H. Spurgeon, (1834–1892) Alexander Maclaren (1826–1910) John Alexis Edgren (1839–1908) Oswald Chambers (1874–1917) F.B Meyer (1847–1929) George W. Truett, (1867–1944) J. Frank Norris (1877–1952) Mordecai Ham (1877–1961) Harry Emerson Fosdick (1878–1969) W.A. Criswell (1909–2002) E.V. Hill (1934–2003) Tony Campolo (born 1935) Duke Kimbrough McCall (born 1914) Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929–1968) Moishe Rosen (born 1932) Jerry Falwell (1933–2007) Adrian Rogers (1931-2005) Charles Stanley (born 1932) Mark Driscoll (born 1970) James T. Draper, Jr. (born 1935) John MacArthur (born 1939)[5][6] Jesse Jackson (born 1941) Lewis Brown (born 1941) Neiliezhü Üsou (1941–2009) Stephen F. Olford (1918-2004) John Piper, (1946-)[7] Albert Mohler (born 1959) Mark Dever (born 1960) Corey J. Hodges (born 1971) Douglas W. Phillips (born 1965) Kent Hovind, creationist Johnny Hunt (born 1952) Paul Washer (born 1961) Roger Spadlin (born 1954) co-Senior Pastor of Valley Baptist Church of Bakersfield Methodist[edit] Daniel Rowland (1713–1790) Francis Asbury (1747–1816) Peter Cartwright (1785–1873) William Booth (1829–1912) – founder of the Salvation Army Bob Jones, Sr. (1883–1968) William Edwin Sangster (1900-1960) Carl Stuart Hamblen (1908–1989) William Willimon (born 1946)[4] Church of Christ[edit] Batsell Baxter (1886–1956) Batsell Barrett Baxter (1916–1982) B. C. Goodpasture (1895–1977) Marshall Keeble (1878–1968) Max Lucado (born 1955) Ira North (1892–1984) Cline Paden (1919–2007) Walter Scott (1796–1861) Kenneth W. Wright (born 1945) Members Church of God International[edit] Eliseo Soriano (born 1947) Daniel Razon (born 1967) Charismatic[edit] David Du Plessis (1905–1987) Derek Prince (1915–2003) Chuck Smith (born 1927), founder of Calvary Chapel movement John Wimber (1934–1997), a founding leader of the Vineyard Movement Reinhard Bonnke (born 1940) Joyce Meyer (born 1943) Willie George, founder of Church on the Move and the Gospel Bill Show T. D. Jakes, founder and senior pastor of the Potter’s House Church in Dallas, Texas W.F. Kumuyi (born 1941) Michael A. McCain (born 1985) Founder of Kingdom Builders Assembly International Inc. The author of “Prayerology” & ” The Purpose Driven Prayer Life”. Jim Orate (born 1945) Jimmy Swaggart (born 1935) Pentecostal[edit] Alexander Boddy (1854–1930) Smith Wigglesworth (1859–1947) Bishop Charles Harrison Mason (1866-1961) William J. Seymour (1870–1922) Bishop Garfield Thomas Haywood (1880-1931) Lewi Pethrus (1884–1974) Kathryn Kuhlman (1907–1976) William Marrion Branham (1909–1965) Oral Roberts (1918-2009) David Wilkerson (1931–2011) Bernie L. Wade (born 1963) Geoffrey Kusinyi Wafula [born 1977] * Pastor Anthony Wynn [born 1960] Mark J. Sheppeard (born 1982-present) Founder and host of Faith Talk Radio Seventh-day Adventist[edit] Joseph Bates (1792 – 1872) Ellen G. White (1827-1915) John Nevins Andrews (1829 – 1883) H. M. S. Richards, Sr. (1894–1985) Mark Finley Jan Paulsen Doug Batchelor David Asscherick Dwight Nelson Wintley Phipps George Vandeman(1916-2000) Four Square Gospel[edit] Aimee Semple McPherson (1890–1944) Jack W. Hayford (born 1934)[4] James Ranger Senior Pastor of Bakersfield New Life Center Matthew Barnett Senior Pastor of Angelus Temple in Los Angelus Other Protestant[edit] Dwight Moody Dwight Moody (1837–1899) William Irvine (1863–1947), evangelist and founder of the Cooneyite and Two by Twos sects Edward Cooney (1867–1960), evangelist and early worker in the Cooneyite and Go-Preacher sects Preachers noted for secular achievements[edit] John Donne Ralph Waldo Emerson Dr John Bodkin Adams (1899–1983), a preacher among the Plymouth Brethren but arrested in 1956 for murdering two patients. Controversially found not guilty but suspected of up to 163 deaths.[8] Bill “Parson” Brownlow (1805–1877), Methodist, anti-secessionist newspaper owner and journalist, and later governor of Tennessee John Danforth (born 1936), Episcopalian, Republican Senator from Missouri. B.G. Dyess (born 1922), Baptist, Louisiana state senator and Rapides Parish voter registrar Cristóbal Diatristán de Acuña, (1597–1676), Catholic, explorer Laurence Sterne (1713–1759), Anglican, novelist Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (1787–1851) Congregationalist, deaf educator, Gallaudet University is named in his honor. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882), Unitarian, poet James Garfield (1831–1851), Disciples of Christ, U. S. President Eric Liddell (1902–1945), Baptist, Olympian featured in the movie Chariots of Fire Hugh Beaumont (1903–1984), Methodist, Television actor Jerry Clower (1926–1998), Baptist, rural humorist David Bauer, (1924–1988), Roman Catholic, hockey player and coach Fred Rogers (1928–2003), Presbyterian, children’s television host Della Reese (born 1931), non-denominational, actress Bill Moyers (born 1935), Baptist, White House Press Secretary Grady Nutt (1937–1982), Baptist, Christian comedian, Hee Haw regular (1979–82)[9] Clifton Davis (born 1945), Seventh-day Adventist, actor George Foreman (born 1949), boxer Sam Kinison (1953–1992), charismatic, comedian Mike Huckabee Baptist (2008 Presidential candidate and former governor of Arkansas)[10] Ernie Fletcher (born 1956), Baptist (former lay preacher) Governor of Kentucky Richard Rossi (born 1963) Filmmaker and musician Christopher Priest (born 1961) Baptist, comic book author and editor Reggie White (1961–2004), Baptist/Messianic (Torah-observant), football player Kirk Cameron (born 1970), evangelical, actor John Williams, Uniting Church in Australia, scientist Fictional preachers[edit] This section lists fictional ministers of religion who were notable for their preaching. This article contains embedded lists that may be poorly defined, unverified or indiscriminate. Please help to clean it up to meet Wikipedia’s quality standards. Where appropriate, incorporate items into the main body of the article. (November 2011) Literature[edit] Bishop Manuel Aringarosa, Catholic – The Da Vinci Code (later a film) Friar Lawrence, Catholic (Anglican) – Romeo and Juliet Reverend Bunting, unspecified denomination – The Invisible Man Dr. Chasuble, unspecified – The Importance of being Earnest Arthur Dimmesdale, Puritan/Congregationalist – The Scarlet Letter Paul Ford, unspecified – Pollyanna Elmer Gantry, unspecified (charismatic) – Elmer Gantry (later a film) Tim Kavanaugh, Episcopalian – At Home in Mitford (and sequels) Lankaster Merrin, Catholic – The Exorcist Father Mulcahy – M*A*S*H (later a film and a television series) Reverend Harry Powell – The Night of the Hunter (later a film) Reverend Sykes, AME – To Kill a Mockingbird Chaplain Tappman, Anabaptist Catch-22 (later a film) Film[edit] Henry Biggs, Baptist – The Preacher’s Wife Bishop Henry Broughman, unspecified (possibly Episcopalian, Methodist or Lutheran) – The Bishop’s Wife Sonny Duvall, Pentecostal – The Apostle Father Fitzgibbon, Catholic – Going My Way Graham Hess, Episcopalian – Signs Tim O’Dowd, Catholic – Going My Way Chuck O’Malley, Catholic – Going My Way and The Bells of Saint Mary’s Jonas Nightengale, unspecified (charismatic) – Leap of Faith Samuel Whitehead, Methodist – Angel in My Pocket Reverend Ford, unspecified – Pollyanna Jacob DeBarge, unspecified (probably Baptist, Pentecostal, or Charismatic) – Let it Shine 1=== Television === Alexander Anderson, Catholic Hellsing David Randolph, Charismatic, Good News Robert Alden, unspecified (possibly Lutheran or Congregationalist) – Little House on the Prairie Eric Camden, unspecified Mainline Protestant, 7th Heaven Frank Dowliing, Catholic – Father Dowling Mysteries Mr. Eko, Catholic (self-proclaimed) – Lost Matthew Fordwick, Baptist – The Waltons Reuben Gregory, unspecified – Amen Reverend Timothy Lovejoy, Presbylutheran – The Simpsons Reverend Gaylord Pierson – According to Jim Francis Xavier Reyneux (Father Ray), Catholic – Nothing Sacred Noah “Hardstep” Rivers, Catholic – Hell Town Mike Weber, Episcopalian – Soul Man Chris Stevens, Worldwide Church of Truth and Beauty, (which, like the Universal Life Church, offers at large ordination regardless of training or theological ideology. In Stevens’ case, he answered an ad in the back of Rolling Stone) – Northern Exposure Karen Stroup, Methodist – King of the Hill Daniel Webster, Episcopalian – Book of Daniel Rev. Grady Williams, Baptist – The Grady Nutt Show[11] Bishop Louie Santos – Jesus Christ “To God Be The Glory International Church” 1985, Calamba, Quezon City, Philippines. “Friends Again” – TV Program every Saturday.. Sunday Service at Cuneta Astrodome, Manila See also[edit] List of United States televangelists List of Campus Preachers List of ministers of the Universal Life Church Lists of Roman Catholics References[edit] Jump up ^ Øverland, Orm The Western Home (published by Norwegian-American Historical Association, distributed by the University of Illinois Press. 1996, Chapter 14, page 196) Jump up ^ http://www.stmarcus.com/index.html Jump up ^ http://www.timeofgrace.org ^ Jump up to: a b c Michael Duduit. “The 25 Most Influential Pastors of the Past 25 Years”. Preaching Magazine. Retrieved 2011-06-04. Jump up ^ Center for Baptist Studies Jump up ^ Michael Duduit. “The 25 Most Influential Pastors of the Past 25 Years”. Preaching Magazine. Retrieved 2011-06-04. Jump up ^ Michael Duduit. “The 25 Most Influential Pastors of the Past 25 Years”. Preaching Magazine. Retrieved 2011-06-04. Jump up ^ Cullen, Pamela V., “A Stranger in Blood: The Case Files on Dr John Bodkin Adams”, London, Elliott & Thompson, 2006, ISBN 1-904027-19-9 Jump up ^ H. Allen Anderson: Grady Lee Nutt from the Handbook of Texas Online. Retrieved January 29, 2009. Jump up ^ Gretel C. Kovach, Sarah Elkins, Suzanne Smalley and Sarah Kliff. “A Pastor’s True Calling.” Newsweek December 17, 2007. Retrieved January 6, 2008. Jump up ^ “The Grady Nutt Show” Yahoo! TV., Note from Rowland Croucher: Dear friends, Here’s a list of preachers who have inspired more preaching-pastors than any others in the 20th century. I’ve read sermons from all of them – and adapted quite a few for my own preaching… [If you’re interested in listening to James Stewart (‘The Wind of the Spirit’) and W E Sangster (‘The Church’), I have an MP3 with these two famous sermons on it, plus a lot of John Mark Ministries’ seminars/preaching/powerpoints. It also has a few rare F W Boreham sermons and radio talks. Just $30 AUD including airmail postage anywhere. Email me c/- the contact button at the top of this page, or directly via rcroucher@gmail.com]. ***** Michael Duduit, Editor, Preaching The past year (1999?) has produced an avalanche of “best of the century” and “best of the millennium” stories and listings in the media. From the 100 most important events of the century to the 50 best entertainers to the 25 best athletes, it seems that there is a list for every interest. Such listings are more than speculative fancies. A historical rarity such as the event we are about to face on December 31 offers a prime opportunity to look back and consider those persons who have made such a difference in our lives and in our world. Thus it is with preaching. As a way to celebrate the end of a century and the start of a new millennium — and to celebrate the committed Christian preachers who have so influenced our calling and our faith communities — Preaching magazine undertook an effort to identify the great preachers of our century and of the past thousand years. The search began with a request to our readers to nominate their own favorites. The result was hundreds of nominations of preachers who have made an impact beyond the lives of their own churches. Among the outstanding preachers who were nominated were names like F.W. Boreham, Oswald Hoffman, Walter Maier, John Maxwell, Harold John Ockenga, Fulton Sheen, and many more. Based on those nominations, a list of 27 names was prepared and sent to Preaching’s Board of Contributing Editors. That group was invited to identify and rank (1-10) their own list of the century’s great preachers; they also had an opportunity to suggest names which had not been included on the original list. Their rankings were then tallied according to the rankings made by the contributing editors (giving increased weight based on the higher rankings) and the number of times a person was listed in each editor’s “top ten.” The result is in the list provided below. For those who are interested in the names that didn’t quite make the top ten, here’s the “second ten” in the order they were ranked: 11. Leslie Weatherhead 12. George W. Truett 13. R.G. Lee 14. Norman Vincent Peale 15. Peter Marshall 16. E. Stanley Jones 17. Donald Grey Barnhouse 18. Ralph Sockman 19. W.A. Criswell 20. Gardner C. Taylor ~~ What makes a preacher “great”? For purposes of this listing, the primary characteristic seems to be the influence that preacher had on the church and on the wider society. For example, while several persons commented that they would not be supportive of many of his theological positions, they could not deny the powerful influence Harry Emerson Fosdick exerted on the character of preaching in the modern era. It is almost certain that no reader would identify the exact same ten preachers in making his or her own list; even given the same list of names, the order in which they appeared would vary widely from person to person. Yet one thing cannot be denied: every person on the list below has made a significant impact on countless lives, on the church, and on their fellow preachers. 1. James S. Stewart (1896-1990) Most readers will be surprised that Stewart’s name appears at the top of such a list, though few would deny he belongs in this distinguished company. The gifted Scottish preacher taught New Testament at the University of Edinburgh, was Chaplain to the Queen in Scotland, and served in 1963-1964 as Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. Stewart was committed to expository preaching, and preached with an earnestness and energy that was warmly received by his listeners. Much of Stewart’s influence on American preaching was through his writing and lectures. His books such as Heralds of God (the published version of his Warrack Lectures at Edinburgh) and A Faith to Proclaim (the published version of his Lyman Beecher Lectures on Preaching at Yale) have inspired tens of thousands of preachers to strive for greater effectiveness in their proclamation of God’s Word. As Stewart challenged in A Faith to Proclaim: “‘I, yet not I, but Christ.’ To be thus taken command of, so that our testimony, when we go out to speak of Christ, is not ours at all, but Christ’s self-testimony — this is our vocation and the hope of our ministry. It is God’s great promise and demand to every preacher of the Word. Here, in all reverence and humility, the disciple may take upon his lips the saying of his Lord: ‘To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world.’” ********** “Born in 1893, the son of a popular Bible teacher in the YMCA movement, James Stewart was an acclaimed preacher both in his native Scotland and also in America. He served as Pastor of three Church of Scotland congregations, and then joined the faculty of New College, the divinity school of the University of Edinburgh. Though I never had the privilege of hearing Stewart preach in person, I have listened, spell-bound, to some taped sermons, and have underlined many a memorable statement in those I have read in my library. He was a preacher’s preacher, possessing gifts most of us can only dream of. I appreciate his ministry for many reasons — his sermons were thorough-ly biblical (he argued persuasively for expository preaching), erudite without being stuffy, eloquent though not ornate, moving but not cheaply emotional, eminently practical, often conscience-piercing, and above all, God-exalting. Yet the thing I appreciate most is his commitment to the mandate of world evangelization. In his own preaching he did not hesitate to call men and women to personal faith in Christ, and he challenged his students and others to do the work of the evangelist. In his Beecher Lectures in 1953 he declared with characteristic directness, that there is “no place today for a Church that is not aflame with the Spirit who is the Lord and Giver of life, nor any value in a theology which is not passionately missionary” (A Faith to Proclaim, p.12). In an earlier book consisting of lectures on preaching originally given to his students, he wrote that “no Church is anything more than a pathetic pietistic backwater unless it is first and fundamentally and all the time a world missionary Church” (Heralds of God, p. 30). (William Hogan, Professor Emeritus of Preaching, Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, MS) *********** 2. Billy Graham (1918- ) A dynamic preacher and evangelist, Billy Graham — through the televising of mass crusades — has proclaimed the gospel to more persons than any other preacher in history. In the process, Graham has become a “national chaplain” for Americans and a world citizen and ambassador for Christ. Graham’s preaching is simple and straightforward, filled with illustrations drawn from the day’s headlines. And each sermon is focused intently on a single purpose: to draw men and women to saving faith in Jesus Christ. Over a ministry about to enter its seventh decade, God has blessed Graham’s preaching and has used his faithfulness and integrity to draw hundreds of thousands to respond to the call of Christ. Through his long life and ministry, Graham has built a remarkable organization which today reaches far beyond sponsoring mass evangelistic crusades. Through television and movies, radio, books and magazines, and a network of related activities, this anointed preacher has faithfully proclaimed Christ across America and around the globe. ********** “The numbers speak of greatness and complexity. He has preached in person to more people than any human being who has ever lived. While his pulpit started in white-frame churches, trailer parks, and circus tents it rapidly moved to cathedrals, stadiums, and other arenas which are among the world’s largest public gathering places. He’s been called “America’s Pastor” and has ministered personally to several American presidents. Over 100 million people have listened to his sermons. Almost 3 million of those people have responded to his famous “invitations.” But when all is said and done, Billy Graham is just a simple man with a simple message. Raised on a North Carolina dairy farm, Graham’s pious parents were old-fashioned enough to believe in corporal punishment, mandatory daily Bible readings, and regular lectures on clean living. And while numerous icons of morality have come and gone, for 50 years Graham has endured both criticism and applause with humility, integrity, and genuineness. Simplicity truly characterizes his message. Through all the accolades he has presented a strong Christianity with a big God, a loving Savior, a hot hell, and a glorious heaven. Yet his message has remained incredibly simple: every person is sinful before God, a predicament that can turn to forgiveness only through faith in Jesus Christ. He has communicated it through simple phrases like “The Bible says . . .” and “You must be born again” that have riveted themselves into our hearts and minds. His delivery has been even more simple, characterized by crispness and clarity that even the youngest of listeners is able to grasp. Thank God for a preacher who takes Jesus at His Word. Thank God for a simple preacher. Thank God for Billy Graham.” (Jim Shaddix, Professor of Preaching, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary) *********** 3. George Buttrick (1892-1980) An English-born Congregational preacher who served nearly thirty years as pastor of New York’s Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church, Buttrick succeeded Henry Sloane Coffin. From that distinguished pulpit Buttrick began a teaching career at Union Theological Seminary, then as Preacher to the University at Harvard. Buttrick exerted a profound influence on a generation of American preachers. He wrote many books and articles, and twice delivered the prestigious Lyman Beecher Lectures on Preaching at Yale. In his preaching, Buttrick sought to lift up Christ, and he believed only that preaching which was centered on the cross would impact eternity. As he said in his Yale lectures: “In a Cathedral at Lucca there is a crucifix said to have been carved by Nicodemus — so clumsily carved that he left it in despair. But (says the story) in that despair an angel came while he slept and made the crucifix true both to the eye of the craftsman and the eye of the worshipper. A Spirit can thus redeem our poor preaching of the Cross. To such preaching we must pledge ourselves. Let the history of the Church be for a witness that power has visited the Church in such preaching, and that power has ebbed when the Cross has been forgotten. In any event love compels us to cry — it is all such preaching need hope or wish to say — ‘Behold the Man!’” ********** “During his lifetime, three generations of seminarians sought Buttrick out not only as a man who knew homiletics, but more than that one who could really preach. He served brief congregational pastorates in Vermont and Illinois before he moved to Buffalo, NY, to serve the First Presbyterian Church. From there he moved to the Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church in New York City, which was to be his most prominent pulpit. In the mid-fifties he began his teaching career, first at Union Theological Seminary and later Harvard. His brilliant career in homiletics was not free of all handicaps. He was considered not to have the dramatic sort of voice that generated pulpit electricity. In fact, he said of himself that he had an “odd sandy voice, the voice of an old nurse” (Alphabet of Grace, 1970, p. 44). Nonetheless he was forceful in the pulpit and became a master at sermon construction and orderly, powerful discourse. His discipline and talent came in time to be ranked alongside Harry Emerson Fosdick and Paul Scherer. His teaching influenced all sorts of notable pulpiteers, including Frederick Buechner. His most popular courses had to do with the outlining of sermons. He believed that a sermon’s architecture should render the sermon pleasing, beautiful, orderly and useful. His love of literature and the arts informed his clean, simple sermon outlines that intersected all of life. His sermons abounded with literary quotations. Buttrick believed a sermon should always bear the kind of truth that saves. Once, when his church members asked him to preach more like a fundamentalist, with fundamentalist truth, he replied, “A telephone directory is literally true, and the parable of the prodigal son is not; but the telephone book is not salvation, whereas that story of human folly and divine mercy is like a daybreak on our darkness.” (The Sign of a Savior, Dec. 23, 1928). His poignant love of communication and his devotion to Biblical truth, was his gift to preaching in the 20th century. (Calvin Miller, Professor of Preaching, Beeson Divinity School, Birmingham, AL) ********** 4. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968) King was a gifted African-American preacher and civil rights leader whose sermonic appeals for justice and personal activism helped change the course of American life. His prophetic words and actions resulted in his recognition as a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He was tragically assassinated in 1968. Though his theological training was provided in a context of theological liberalism, as King’s ministry progressed — as pastor of Montgomery’s Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, then Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church — his preaching grew increasingly more evangelical and biblical. His sermons became more Christ-centered, with a growing emphasis on the cross. Steeped in the rhetorical traditions of the African-American church, King displayed gifts in the pulpit and the political arena that made him one of the most compelling speakers of the century. It is important to remember that the leader of the most profound American social movement of this century described himself as “fundamentally a clergyman, a Baptist preacher.” ********** “Martin Luther King, Jr. was a man of great passion, devotion, and humor. His humorous side is not frequently discussed, and though often portrayed by the media to be a rather serious, no nonsense individual, in reality he was the epitome of humor. However, while he could greatly amuse a select group of friends in private, it was his passion and devotion that caught the international spotlight. From his family he inherited a sense of mission that encompassed him as a preacher and a Civil Rights leader. A major source of King’s theology was the African-American church. Perhaps the greatest gift willed to King from the African-American church was that of an indomitable faith in God which reverberated through his sermons and speeches. Of the many career opportunities King could have pursued, he chose to take a full time pastorate. Above everything else, Martin King considered himself a preacher of the gospel. Apparently King was often disappointed that he was not primarily seen as a preacher. King was a poet and an artist in the pulpit. He saw no incompatibility between biblical preaching and preaching on relevant social issues. That is only part of his legacy to modern preachers. King has helped ministers to recover the relevance of preaching for our day, to motivate Christians to blend their theology with their ethics, and to translate their faith in God in the social, economic and political struggle, while not being afraid to use philosophy and formal reasoning. Ultimately King breathed life back into many preachers simply through his profound approach of addressing the audience cardiologically and colonially. Just as his passion, devotion, and humor sprang from his head as well as his mind, so he directed them and his message to the head and minds of others. (Robert Smith, Professor of Preaching, Beeson Divinity School, Birmingham, AL) ********** 5. Harry Emerson Fosdick (1878-1969) One of the most influential preachers of the century, Fosdick’s ministry coincided with the growth of radio, contributing to his national prominence. As pastor of New York’s Riverside Church, he was minister to the Rockefellers and other prominent business and civic leaders, yet he was known as an advocate of social change. Considered by many to be the finest pulpit orator of his generation, Fosdick has had a continuing influence on the shape of American preaching into the present day. He was a practitioner of what he called “life situation preaching,” a homiletical model which focused the sermon on human need and climaxed in a call to human action. Though his homiletical approach grew out of his own liberal theological views, his model gave a new shape to American preaching, including much evangelical preaching. ********** “My first introduction to Harry Emerson Fosdick was at Stetson University in Deland, Florida, while a student there. That was back in the days when chapel was required of students. Preachers from around the area were invited to speak. This was a good education for a young man preparing for the ministry because we heard many sermon styles and many forms of delivery. On one particular Wednesday morning, I was arrested out of my boredom during chapel by a particularly stimulating sermon brought to us by one of the leading “Fundamentalists” in our area. This sermon was thoughtful, incisive, communicated quite well, and used scripture in an unusually intelligent way. It was not like so many sermons I had endured in which the preacher had laboriously beaten us over the head with unexamined propositions, but rather it was focused directly upon our needs, took us by the hand and led us in to the scriptures as the answer to the needs the pastor was discussing. After chapel, I was discussing the sermon with one of my professors. He acknowledged that it was an exceptionally good sermon. But he commented to me that it was unusual to hear that sermon coming from that preacher because the preacher had spent a great deal of his ministery fighting “modernism.” Then he went on to tell me the other reason the sermon was so unusual; it was one of Harry Emerson Fosdick’s sermons, and Fosdick was the leading “modernist” of the time. He proceeded to go to his library, pulled out a book by Fosdick and opened it to the exact page and showed me the sermon. I had trouble putting all this together but I did know there was something about this sermon that was different. Later in seminary as we began to study great preachers, I discovered Fosdick as an oasis in a dry desert. I read everything by Fosdick I could get my hands on. I saw in Fosdick, not a source of sermons but a dimension of preaching that had been withheld from me in my early development. Here were delightful subjects, well researched, magnificently focused and artistically presented, from an obvious preacher who was profoundly committed to the Christian gospel and to the church of Jesus Christ. Like other preachers, I have stolen my share of Fosdick’s sermons. I’ll admit it, but so has every other preacher, whatever his theological stripe may be. But there comes a time when you can’t live off another person’s work. You can’t be David in Saul’s armor. Fosdick taught me to lighten up, not to take myself too seriously, but to take the gospel and the preaching of the gospel very seriously, and to communicate. For this, each time I step into the pulpit, I know that in one way or another, my congregation owes a great debt to him. (William L. Self, Pastor, Johns Creek Baptist Church, Alpharetta, GA) ********** 6. G. Campbell Morgan (1863-1945) Called by many “the prince of expositors,” G. Campbell Morgan helped influence the shape of evangelical preaching on both sides of the Atlantic. Born in England, raised in Wales, Morgan lacked formal education but his absolute confidence in scripture made him an avid student and interpreter of the Word. This skilled expository preacher served several English congregations before an itinerant ministry in the U.S. (1901-1904). From 1904 to 1917 he served as pastor of London’s Westminster Chapel, a church which experienced unparalleled growth under his leadership. Following more years in America, Morgan returned to Westminister Chapel in 1933 (at age 69) and served for a decade during one of the most dangerous periods of Britain’s history. Morgan’s love of the Bible shone through his sermons, which were carefully prepared and then presented with an anointed intensity. His successor as pastor of Westminster Chapel, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, said of Morgan that “preaching was the supreme passion of his life.” ********** “The first and best advise I ever received on the subject of preparing a sermon recalled the fundamental design of G. Campbell Morgan’s expository method: “Read the text. Read it again and again. Read it 25 to 50 times. The whole book. In context. Only then will you understand the text and be ready to preach it.” Though I didn’t know it then, that recommendation expressed the expositional approach to preaching the Bible that Morgan practiced, a model that has influenced thousands of theologically conservative Bible teachers and preachers. Campbell died four years before I was born. I never heard him preach. Yet because the influence of his popular preaching, extensive itinerant teaching, and prolific writing still lives, I feel as if I have heard him time and again in the sermons of others. They have studied the text in context, analyzed, synthesized, and expounded the truth of Scripture with clear and compelling arguments. That’s the model of preaching I grew up on and have tried to master. Two stories about Morgan have especially influenced me. The first was how he was rejected for formal ministry because his preaching showed so little potential. In the dark days that followed his father reminded him, “rejected on earth . . . accepted in heaven.” God will be the final judge of our gift. What a relief. What a challenge. Second, when his studies in theology and science led to doubts about the truth of the Scriptures, Campbell put away all his books except The Book. His primary text and tool became the Bible. The Bible, first and foremost, gives authority to what we proclaim. God’s ideas, not mine. What a relief. What a challenge. While changing times demand changing styles of preaching, the first and best advise to any preacher remains, “read the text.” (Timothy S. Warren, Professor of Pastoral Ministries, Dallas Theological Seminary) ********** 7. William Edwin Sangster (1900-1960) A strongly evangelical Methodist preacher, he served for sixteen years as pastor of London’s Westminster Central Hall, where he preached weekly to 3,000 souls. During World War II he had the largest Sunday-evening congregation in London, filling the 2,500-seat hall, and he opened the large basement as a bomb shelter for those in need. At different points in his ministry he succeeded two of the most popular Methodist preachers in Britain (Leslie Weatherhead and Dinsdale T. Young). He concluded his ministry as head of the home mission department of the Methodist Church, before his deterioration and death because of progressive muscular atrophy. Sangster combined evangelical intensity with a brilliant mind and gifted use of language. As Leslie Weatherhead once described one of Sangster’s books of sermons, “No chapter finishes by making you say, ‘What a clever writer Sangster is.’ They all make you say, ‘What a wonderful Savior Jesus is.’” ********** “It isn’t easy to say how much the ethos of British Methodism shaped W. E. Sangster and how much he shaped it. Suffice it to say that his sermons exemplify the best of that strand of homiletics in the 20th century. Though Sangster died many years before I became a minister in the Manchester and Salford Methodist Mission, I immediately recognized characteristics of his method in the sermons I heard others preach, and in the values and lifestyle of fellow clergy. The product of a working-class family, Sangster was educated in London and Birmingham, and served in the army during World War I. He had served several churches before his appointment to Westminster Central Hall in 1939. A man of the people, he literally lived with the people, moving his family into a community bomb shelter created in the church basement during the war. Sangster’s preaching was orthodox, grounded in Scripture but not necessarily expository, and called listeners to action as well as reflection. A gifted storyteller, his sermon illustrations range from accounts of the desolation of war-ravaged cities or observations about drunkenness to quotations from Matthew Arnold and John Bunyan. His more doctrinal sermons can perhaps be likened to the hymnody of Charles Wesley, about which it has been said that whatever earthly topic they begin with, they end in heaven. Sangster’s sermons look forward to God’s future, encouraging the listener to trust God’s promises. The timely references in his messages may date him, yet aspects of his method provide a model for preaching in the post-modern world: knowing the world of the listener, taking the listener’s experience seriously, and embodying the hope we have in Christ.” (Carol M. Noren, Professor of Preaching, North Park Theological Seminary, Chicago, IL) ********** 8. John R.W. Stott (1921-2011 ) A favorite preacher among evangelicals around the globe, John Stott was Rector Emeritus of All Souls Church in London and Director of the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity. He served at All Souls Church as assistant curate (1945-50), as Rector (1950-75), and as Rector Emeritus since 1975. He was appointed a Chaplain to the Queen from 1959 to 1991. Since his retirement, Stott invested much of his ministry in working with pastors, church leaders and students in the Third World. He was the author of over 40 books, including Basic Christianity and The Cross of Christ. In his book I Believe in Preachin

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